Nov 12, 2018
By
Gabriel Weinstein, Project Manager, Digital Content and Communications

Educator Spotlight: Miri Rubin

Miri Rubin, Ramaz Middle School

Miri Rubin’s preparation for her career in EdTech began as a child. She grew up in a family of educators and technology enthusiasts.

“We were always interested in using technology to improve things,” Miri recalled.

In college, Miri followed her passion for technology and pedagogy. A strong math student, she majored in computer science and education. After graduation Miri moved to Jerusalem and was hired as the educational technology coordinator at Chorev Elementary School. During her years in Israel she helped bring the Internet to Chorev and developed their technology curriculum.

When Miri returned to the United States she was hired at The Ramaz School. In her role as Ramaz Middle School’s educational technology coordinator, Miri works with students and teachers. She runs professional development sessions and helps teachers integrate technology into the classroom. With students, she does everything from teaching computer programming classes to helping students create 3D printed dreidels. This year Miri is focusing on integrating more STEM skills into the Judaic Studies curriculum.

To succeed in EdTech, Miri stresses that students and teachers must not be afraid of failure. She emphasized that children and educators who thrive in EdTech settings pivot and adapt when challenges arise.

“In EdTech students are allowed to fail. They do not need to have the perfect solution for every problem,” Miri said. “A successful EdTech student will say: ‘This didn’t work. How will I change to make this a successful approach?’ I believe the same outlook applies to teachers.”

Miri’s goal is for Ramaz Middle School graduates to leave with confidence in their technological abilities. She designed the curriculum to nurture students’ skills as media consumers, content creators, and technological innovators. Throughout the year students flex their EdTech skills in physical computing,programming and digital media.

During her 19 years at Ramaz, consumer technology and software has exploded. Miri said that students now have access to a plethora of multimedia tools that do not require high level skills. Today’s teachers have much easier access to powerful tools to identify students’ strengths and weaknesses than at the beginning of Miri’s career.

“The best part about EdTech are the surprises that come down the line,” she said. “It’s never a boring job. There is always something developing and changing.”

Three decades into her career, Miri’s excitement and passion for educational technology is higher than ever. “I am in one of the most exciting fields. I get to educate students and interact with technology. Being able to do both things everyday is amazing to me.”

Related News

No news posts found.

Related Resources

No related resources found.

Related networks

No related networks found.